Book Review: Hocus Pocus & The Sequel

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I found out about Hocus Pocus & The Sequel a few months ago from a fellow book blogger who reviewed it and loved it. Since I adore the movie Hocus Pocus, I thought it would be a fun and timely read.

The first half of the book is a retelling of the original Hocus Pocus movie. In 1693, the three Sanderson sisters were accused of witchcraft and, guilty of kidnapping and killing the children of Salem, were hung. Three hundred years later, Max and his little sister Dani, along with their friend Allison, accidentally bring the Sanderson sisters back from the dead and have to stop the witches from once again killing children; only this time, if the witches succeed they will achieve immortality, so there is much more at stake.

This half of the book was spot-on exactly like the movie. I imagine the author must have been watching the movie while writing as so many of the scenes and dialogue are perfectly on cue and word-for-word. Part two of the book tells the story of Max and Allison’s seventeen year-old daughter Poppy who manages to accidentally bring the witches back again, twenty-five years later.

I’m not sure what it was specifically, but part two, the sequel, of this book did not sit well with me. The writing style was a night and day difference from part one, as though two different authors were writing. Whereas Hocus Pocus is kind of a timeless story, the sequel contained so much present-day detail that made it feel too commercial. It read like fan fiction and not in a good way. I’ll admit it was so not my taste that I didn’t even get through the rest of the second half. I was worried it would ruin the original story for me, and it very well may have if I hadn’t stopped reading when I did.

I actually debated about whether or not to even keep this book once I was finished reading! Ultimately, I decided to hang onto it. But that should give you an idea of where I was mentally once I finished reading.

There are plenty of other good books out there and I’d just as soon prefer to get onto the next one than spend time reading something I’m not too sure about, wouldn’t you?

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